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Posts Tagged ‘michael gove’

On Sunday morning I found myself tutting over Michael Gove, who with his thick-rimmed indie spectacles bobbing up and down on the screen, was expostulating against the use of Mr Men characters to help explain Nazi history. How awful! Cartoon characters desecrating the reign of Hitler!

But then, six minutes in, I found myself nodding in assent. This took me by surprise.

Gove wants you to read Middlemarch, rather than Twilight. But actually, he says, he’s just happy if people are reading.

“There’s been an assumption that books like Middlemarch, or plays by Shakespeare, or poems by Keats or Wordsworth, are only ever accessible to a minority, to a gilded elite. I think that’s wrong.”

Thank you for your wise words, Minister.

It really is a valuable philosophy and one that all students of literature should remember. It’s a case of approaching works like this fearlessly, facing them head-on and making them your own. You are the poets, just as much as the poet.

It’s just a shame it came in the middle of a speech about greatness, where I’m confident I know exactly who he was thinking of…

Party Faithful Attend The Annual Conservative Party Conference

I promise to post something a bit more helpful very soon.

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from poetrybyheart.org

poetrybyheart.org

The government is backing a poetry-reciting competition for young people. Although Bad to Verse knows few people that welcome the Department for Educations’s initiatives with open arms, and recognises that for others this is a nice, romantic throwback shuffled in among Michael Gove’s buttoned-up, antediluvian, Britannia-rules-the-waves educational philosophy, it whole-heartedly celebrates this effort to get people reciting poetry. And let me tell you for why, sirs!

  • So much poetry was meant to be read aloud, whether among peers, or families, or poetry-loving coteries. Speaking poetry gives it the human voice that put the words there in the first place.
  • Speaking a poem over and over again is a great way to lead the brain to think about it – to approach it in different ways as you say it in different ways. This is a great way to appreciate the myriad of layers one poem can have.
  • Lines you learn will stay with you forever. Until you really do forget them. Listening to poetry recited well by somebody else might stay with you even longer.

The competition, called ‘Poetry By Heart’, has invited 14-18 year olds to learn poems from its online anthology of 130 poems. Browse all of them on the competition’s website. Its recent announcement has kicked other forums into thoughtfully discussing the ‘point’ of it all.

The British press has excitedly lapped it up. News editors seem both intrigued and bemused by the idea of reciting poetry.

The Guardian opened up a twitter discussion about the best poems to commit to memory, and Christopher Howse, writing in the Telegraph, recalled some of the greatest poetry anthologies of our time.

Radio 4’s The World Tonight spoke about the competition in a discussion framed with scepticism. Won’t children come to resent poetry if forced to learn it by heart? UK Canal Poet Laureate Jo Bell wasn’t convinced that this kind of rote learning would help young people understand poetry. Michael Schmidt, writer in residence at St John’s College Cambridge, took a different approach. Listen to it here!

The BBC even got Sir Andrew Motion on to talk about it! Nice one, Beebz!

I want to know your thoughts! And possibly steal all the opinions that are better than my own! What do you think?

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